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I brush my teeth regularly. Why do I need to floss?

January 1st, 2020

Brushing your teeth regularly is one of the most crucial parts of maintaining good oral health, and perhaps the most fundamental, however, there are also other elements involved. Flossing, for instance, is also vital; some experts would say, and Dr. Abari and Dr. Will and our team would agree, that it holds just as much importance as brushing your teeth. To give you a better idea of why, here are some reasons that flossing is so vital to your oral health.

Getting in-between the Teeth

While brushing your teeth effectively cleans all of the areas of your teeth that are visible, or otherwise not touching, flossing is vital because it reaches all of the areas between your teeth that you cannot see, and subsequently cannot clean using a toothbrush. These areas are among the most sensitive and vulnerable parts of your mouth because they are most susceptible to plaque and tartar buildup.

Reducing Bad Breath

It is not uncommon for someone who brushes their teeth once or twice a day to still have bad breath. The reason being is that bad breath is often created by smelly bacteria that lives in between your teeth, as well as other areas of your mouth that are not accessible using a toothbrush. And that is why flossing is one of the best ways to reduce or eliminate bad breath. Still skeptical? Try flossing your teeth with unscented floss, then smell it after, that awful scent is the source of your bad breath. Coupled with frequent brushing of your teeth, you will find that flossing can really help that stinky breath.

Brushing your teeth twice a day is hard enough, add flossing on top and it can be difficult to establish a regular habit. However, doing so is totally worth it; just look at the aforementioned reasons why. Use these for motivation the next time you don’t feel like flossing, and let us know if it worked at your next visit to our San Dimas or Diamond Bar, CA office.

Eating Wisely after Wisdom Tooth Extraction

December 25th, 2019

If wisdom tooth extraction is on your calendar, it’s a good idea to visit your grocery store ahead of time to stock up on smart diet options for post-surgery meals. It might be a few weeks before you heal completely, so we have some shopping list suggestions which are safe, soothing, and nutritious to get you through your recovery.

Smart Choices

Soft, Smooth, and Creamy

  • Soft-serve ice cream
  • Frozen yogurt
  • Yogurt
  • Pudding

Now is a good time to indulge yourself, and ice cream, yogurt, and pudding are easy on sensitive tissue and filled with protein, calcium, and vitamin D. Just remember—choose soft flavors with no crunchy, sticky, or chewy additions.  This means no cones, as well. Most important? Nothing with a straw. Suction can cause the dislodgement of the protective clot over your extraction site. And dislodgement of this protective cover can lead to a painful condition known as dry socket.

Sometimes we recommend a wait on milk products immediately after surgery due to anesthesia, medication, or other considerations—we’ll let you know if that’s the case, and when you can safely enjoy dairy products.

Comfort(able) Foods

  • Broth
  • Pureed soups
  • Applesauce
  • Gelatin desserts
  • Clear liquids

Foods that don’t require much chewing won’t irritate tender mouth and gum tissue. You can also find a wide variety of flavors to tempt your palate. Choose broths with higher concentrations of protein, and soups which provide minerals and vitamins. Nothing too hot, though—heat can affect the protective clot over the wound site. Applesauce is not only soothing and flavorful, but is a good source of fiber and vitamin C. Gelatin desserts and clear liquids will help you keep hydrated, which is extremely important as you heal.

Blender-Friendly Creations

  • Smoothies
  • Pureed foods

Want to get creative in the kitchen? Create your own smoothies and purees to suit your individual taste! Blended foods are easy to eat, and you can add vitamins with your choice of fruits and vegetables and proteins or protein powder for nutritional value. (Sip or eat smoothies with a spoon, as straws are still off-limits.)

You can gradually add semi-solid foods such as mashed potatoes, oatmeal, cottage cheese, and scrambled eggs as you recover. Don’t worry—we’ll give you aftercare instructions that will include what you should be eating and drinking right after surgery, and what you can add to your diet as you heal.

Unwise Diet Selections

It wouldn’t be sensible to leave you without some idea of which foods to avoid for the next few weeks. Talk to us about how and when to re-introduce these items to your diet.

  • Grainy, seedy, or crunchy foods, which become tiny particles as you chew, can lodge in the surgical site.
  • Spicy, carbonated, and acidic foods can irritate delicate gum tissue.
  • Sticky and chewy foods can be hard on the extraction side.
  • Hot beverages can interfere with the protective clot that forms over the wound.
  • Alcohol can interact with medications and, according to several studies, potentially slow healing.
  • Anything that requires a straw. Any kind of suction risks dislodging the protective clot at the surgical site. Eat your milkshake with a spoon—it’s still delicious!—and absolutely no cigarettes.

And one final word to the wise: seeing Dr. Abari and Dr. Will for wisdom teeth extraction and follow-up is an excellent idea!

Oral surgeons like Dr. Abari and Dr. Will have a minimum of four years of advanced studies in a hospital-based residency program, where they train with medical residents in the fields of general surgery, anesthesiology, internal medicine, and other specialties with a specific focus on the anatomy of the face, mouth, and jaw. They are uniquely qualified to make sure your wisdom tooth extraction and healing are successful.

If you have any questions about the procedure, and what you can do at home to help the healing process, give our San Dimas or Diamond Bar, CA office a call. We want to help you make the wisest choices for diet, pain relief, wound care, and all of your other aftercare needs.

What Does an Oral Surgeon Do?

December 18th, 2019

Your visit your medical doctor and dentist for your regular health care needs, you see your orthodontist to treat problems with your bite and alignment, and your periodontist looks after your gum health. If one of your medical or dental professionals recommends that you receive treatment from an oral surgeon, you probably have some questions. First of all, why recommend an oral surgeon?

Oral and maxillofacial surgeons are specialists. They have a minimum of four years of surgical education and training in a hospital-based residency program. They train with medical residents, and focus on studies in general surgery, anesthesiology, internal medicine, plastic surgery, otolaryngology (the study of the ear, nose, and throat), among other fields of specialty.

Because oral and maxillofacial education is centered on the face, mouth, and jaw, these surgeons are experts in diagnosing complex medical conditions in these structures and treating them. Your doctor or dentist might recommend an oral surgeon if you require medical or dental care in any of the following fields:

  • Anesthesia

Oral surgeons are trained in the administration of local anesthesia, sedation, and general anesthesia.

  • Craniofacial Surgery

Oral surgeons work, often as part of a team of specialists, to treat congenital conditions such as cleft lips, cleft palates, and cranial anomalies.

  • Facial Cosmetic Surgery

Training in the surgical treatment of the muscles, skin, and bones of the face makes oral surgeons especially qualified to perform cosmetic procedures which enhance aesthetic appearance and improve function.  Ask your oral surgeon about procedures such as chin surgery, cheekbone implants, ear surgery, skin treatments, and other cosmetic surgery options.

  • Facial Injuries and Traumas

Oral surgeons are skilled in repairing complex fractures of the upper and lower jaws as well as treating other facial injuries.

  • Jaw and Temporomandibular Joint (TMJ) Surgery

If you have difficulty biting or swallowing, TMJ pain, sleep apnea, a protruding or receding jaw, or other jaw complications, corrective surgery can restore better, healthier function to your jaw or temporomandibular joint.

  • Oral Cancer Diagnosis and Treatment

Early diagnosis and treatment are critical for recovery, so see your oral surgeon immediately if you or your dentist detect any of the warning signs of oral cancer.

  • Oral Surgeries

Oral surgeons also perform extractions; dental implant surgery; procedures to save a damaged tooth such as apicoectomies, hemisections, and root resections; procedures to treat soft tissue, including frenectomies, soft tissue grafts, and crown lengthening; and surgeries which treat sleep apnea.

Oral surgeons like Dr. Abari and Dr. Will are experts in preserving and restoring the health, the function, and the appearance of your face, mouth, and jaw. If your doctor or dentist recommends that you visit our San Dimas or Diamond Bar, CA office, rest assured that you will be treated by a specialist who is exceptionally qualified to diagnose and treat you.

Foods that Can Harm Enamel

December 11th, 2019

Many people who are careful about brushing and flossing their teeth wonder how they still end up with cavities or tooth decay. Several factors affect wear and tear on tooth enamel. Diet is a major factor, with certain foods increasing the likelihood that your enamel will become discolored or decayed. Pay close attention to the foods you eat to keep your pearly whites looking healthy and clean.

What causes enamel damage?

Tooth enamel refers to the hard, semi-translucent, whitish part of the tooth that shows above your gums. The enamel is primarily composed of minerals that are strong but susceptible to highly acidic foods. When acid reacts with the minerals in enamel, it results in tooth decay. Strongly pigmented foods can also damage enamel by discoloring the surface of the tooth.

Foods that harm enamel

Acidic foods are the greatest source of enamel damage. To determine whether a food is acidic, look up its pH. Scientists use pH, on a one-to-seven scale, to define the relative acidity or alkalinity of a substance. Foods with low pH levels, between a one and three, are high in acidity and may damage your enamel. Foods with high pH levels, such as a six or seven, are far less likely to cause enamel harm.

So which foods should you avoid? Many fruits are high in acidity, including lemons, grapefruit, strawberries, grapes, and apples. The high sugar and acid content in soda makes it another huge contributor to enamel decay. Moderately acidic foods include pineapple, oranges, tomatoes, cottage cheese, maple syrup, yogurt, raisins, pickles, and honey. The foods that are least likely to cause enamel damage include milk, most cheeses, eggs, and water.

Beverages such as red wine and coffee also damage the enamel by discoloring it. Although stains do not necessarily undermine the integrity of your teeth, they can be unsightly.

What can I do to prevent enamel damage?

Fortunately, there are several measures you can take to prevent your enamel from discoloring or decaying. The easiest way to avoid decay is to steer clear of high-acidity foods. This may not always be possible, but eliminating sugary fruit juices and soda from your diet is a good start. Brushing your teeth after each meal and flossing frequently also preserves your enamel. Another good idea is to rinse your mouth with water or mouthwash after eating to wash away high-acidity particles.

Although enamel damage is common, it does not have to be an inevitable occurrence. Knowing the foods that harm your teeth gives you the tools to prevent discoloration and decay. With some easy preventive measures, your teeth will stay strong and white for years to come! Give us a call at Abari Orthodontics & Oral Surgery to learn more!

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Dr. Abari is the best orthodontist ever. My son, Michael, has the most beautiful teeth ever! — Denise F.

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We mostly went to the San Dimas office but the staff is helpful at both locations. My son's teeth look great and we are looking forward to working again with them. Thank you Dr. Abari  —Maya H.

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Loved my experience at Abari and I am thankful for the new & amazing smile that they helped me achieve!!! — Hannah

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